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10/06/2020

Why we need other leadership

Monika Kolb

A glance at the newspaper is enough to get examples of immoral and ineffective leadership behaviour. Traditional leadership is responsible for major global scandals. Efforts to increase only the profit of the company or its own bonuses lead to reckless behaviour which generates short-term profits at the expense of employees, the environment, shareholders or the environment.

Here are 7 reasons why we need different leadership:

 

1. work can contribute to a free, meaningful and self-determined life However, 70 % of the employees in Germany are not committed.

70% of the employees in Germany do service by the book. With drastic consequences for companies (competitive disadvantage, innovation backlog, …) and employees (dissatisfaction, illness, stress). Commitment is significantly promoted by varied and meaningful activities. As well as a pleasant working atmosphere, autonomous decisions, feedback and support from the manager. 

Managers have a great influence on the well-being of employees at work. Satisfied employees are committed employees(1)

2. bad managers cost German companies 105 billion euros annually

“If I don’t care about my company, I don’t care about it.” The consequences for companies and society are alarming: increasing absenteeism, declining innovation and productivity. All this is at the expense of competitiveness and health. This toxic balance destroys essential resources for the future of our economy.

Incorrect management harms organisations, employees and even the manager himself(2)

3. employees leave their superiors / managers, not their companies

The behaviour of bosses is one of the main reasons why employees leave their companies. Every second person has already left his or her job because they had problems with their boss. The employees’ need for healthy leadership is growing. 

So ask yourself these two questions. Am I actually the reason why my colleagues look for a new job? What can I do? (3)

4. good leadership is good for health

Absenteeism is often linked to poor management. Problematic management behaviour not only makes life difficult for employees, it even makes them ill. Complaints such as back pain and exhaustion are reported less frequently when employees receive the necessary recognition. Employees who feel valued by their boss and do meaningful work even have 50% fewer days off work on average than those who do not. 

Good managers are also good for health. (4)

5. productivity increases by approx. 15% through good management behaviour

Good leaders are responsible and achieve more with the team and are more effective than a toxic leader. (5)

6. jobs and competitiveness will be maintained, skilled workers will stay in companies if companies quickly enable a responsible management culture

Companies can transform themselves into high performers by systematically offering their specialists and managers opportunities for further development.

7. How each individual manager acts - that makes the difference

Leadership is the decisive lever for change. Without responsible managers, the future is at stake. Responsible leaders give and are an ANSWER to challenges of the 21st century. 

This situation gives rise to the need for the development of responsible leaders. Leadership development is the lever for good leadership for a better world.

 

Sources: 

(1)

Gallup Engagement Index 2018: https://www.gallup.de/183104/engagement-index-deutschland.aspx

Michael S. Christian, Adela S. Garza and Jerele E. Slaughter: Work Engagement: A Quantitative Review and Test of its Relations With Task and Contextual Performance. Personnel Psychology, 64 (1/2011)].

https://engage.kununu.com/de/blog/mitarbeiter-engagement-vs-mitarbeiter-zufriedenheit/

(2)

https://www.wiwo.de/erfolg/management/fuehrungskraefte-report-2017-schlechte-chefs-kosten-milliarden/20673548-2.html

(3)

https://www.gallup.com/services/182216/state-american-manager-report.aspx

(4)

https://aok-bv.de/presse/pressemitteilungen/2018/index_20972.html

(5)

Bob Sutton, Professor of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University

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